Sunday, 13 October 2013

The Verdun Project: French Cards for "Through the Mud and the Blood"

As readers of this blog will know, I enjoy using the TooFat Lardies rules for "Through the Mud and the Blood" for the Great War games which I run and play in.  One of the things which is needed is a set of cards for the various leaders, support weapons, vehicles and command units on each side.  I'd produced a set of cards for the British and German forces a couple of years back, and I felt it was only fitting for me to prepare a set of cards for French forces as well.


I've therefore  uploaded a new set of cards for "Through the Mud and the Blood" on the blog.  These are a set of cards for French forces, mainly focused on the later years of the Great War.  They should be suitable for 1916 onwards.

I replaced the card for "The Devil's Luck" with a card entitled "Veine de pendu", which I hope means almost the same thing.  If that's not the case, please do let me know!  At this point I've not added cards for the Tirailleurs Marocains or the Tirailleurs Senegalais - I'll wait until the figures for these units are painted before adding these cards in version 2.

I've uploaded the French cards on the blog in the section headed "Playtesting Scenarios, Campaign Diaries, Play-Aids and Painting Guides".  You can find this on the right-hand side of the screen, just above the list of other great blogs I follow. I have also uploaded a set of British and German cards (which are slightly updated from last year's version) and a set of General cards for "Through the Mud and the Blood".  I've shared all of the documents in Google Drive, so hopefully you can all get access.

Please let me know if you have any difficulties accessing any of them.

Making the cards isn't difficult.  I printed off the card-faces on a colour printer, and prepared a card back for each of them - I used the famous image of Lord Kitchener, and added a little photo manipulation.


I then glued the card front and back together and ran the glued cards through a laminator using gloss pockets.  It's a bit more fiddly than sending your designs off to Artscow (who make lovely cards), but I like doing it and it gives me the chance to add a lot of cards which I might not bother with if I was sending away for a card pack to be produced.

Just a quick mention to say that the artistic textures on all the cards were kindly made available for free by a wonderful New Zealand artist, Borealnz.  Her Flickr page is a gold-mine of very generously provided textures, which I recommend as a great way to get started in designing your own cards.   The font on the French cards is Megaopolis Extra, again generously provided for free by Smeltery HERE.   Thanks to both Borealnz and Smeltery for their generosity.



Have a go, as I was surprised how much fun making own cards was.


31 comments:

  1. Yes, thanks for sharing this. I've often wondered and been somewhat clueless about making your own cards, this has really helped!

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    1. Jim, I'm glad I've helped! The cards are really pretty easy to make. They do take a while, but they're fun. You get a nice sense of achievement at the end with a pile of completed cards. I did 72 French cards this weekend in about three hours, in the kitchen with the kids helping (or perhaps that was hindering....) from time to time. All you really need is a colour printer (or a place to print the cards in colour) and a laminator. I think my laminator cost about £24 three years ago (as a rough guide). The glass pockets are inexpensive if you buy them on Amazon. Other than that, just scissors, Pritt-Stick (or glue) and a bit of time....

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  2. These are fab. Thanks for the free textures link - hugely useful.

    What software did you make your cards using?

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    1. Thanks Phyllion! The cards were made using Microsoft PowerPoint on Windows Office. I found that easiest to set up the cards (6 to a page, landscape style) and then the textures can be used to "fill" the cards. Add the font you like and that's it. You can get as creative as yo like - PowerPoint is a really versatile programme, although I only scratched the surface in making the cards. Hope that helps, but if you need more information, just please let me know.

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  3. Great work Sidney, looking over your cards I see you have stretcher bears?
    What rules have you introduced for them, it sounds like something I could pinch for the RJW project.
    Regards
    Stuart

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    1. Ahhhhh...stretcher bearers!! Why don't more manufacturers do these??

      We do have some pre-playtested rules for these which I worked on with Richard about a year or so back. Let me try and find out/ remember where we got to. As memory served, they were going to be quite similar to the medical orderlies in "Chain of Command", but were going to be more tied into the various Great War scenarios. I confess that I don't think we've ever used them on the tabletop. We did have rules for Chaplains which we tried out in one of the "Through the Mud and the Blood" games, but when First Corps brought their stretcher bearers, some of the rules for Chaplains were going to be transferred across.

      Leave it with me and I shall report back!!

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  4. That's some fabulous work, Sidney. Until I read this, I wouldn't even know how to go about making cards for a game.

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    1. I can't believe a man of your resourcefulness would be stumped by making a few cards, Monty!!! They're pretty simple and they'd look good in your games. You'd have no problems! Give it a try sometime!

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  5. Great cards, Sidney. And thanks for sharing!

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  6. Delightful attention to detail as always Sidney. A very classy addition to the tabletop. Aye, Rusty

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    1. Rusty, that's very kind, thank you. They're a fun addition to make for any game, and not at all difficult! All the best!

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  7. These are great. I love tweaking with cards, especially for Lardies games.

    Frank
    http://adventuresinlead.blogspot.com.au/

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    1. Frank, you should know that the "Big Men Cards" (which we used at Bovington last year and which I'll feature in French versions in a later blog post this year) were inspired by your own wonderful cards for "Sharp Practice". As you say, tweaking cards for any game is a lot of fun. Thanks for dropping by!!

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  8. Just a quick note to mention that I have added a couple of cards to the French card deck this morning. Inexplicably, I forgot a card for the French "Hommes Soupes" - which will certainly feature in a future game. I also added a couple of details on the cards for the "up from the ranks" Big Men, to make it clear that these cards can be added during a game. The same applies to the Brevet promotion (to Capitaine) for one of the Status III Big Men. Hope that all helps!

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  9. Stunning work !!!

    Best regards Michael

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  10. Great post and fantastic looking cards!

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  11. I discovered your blog yesterday and it's just amazing ! A real pleasure for or eyes and a treasure of informations around WWI.

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  12. Very posh indeed and nicely done too!

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  13. Great update mate, thanks for the fantastic looking cards. Those background textures are fab as well.
    Ben

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